Slantski

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16th Feb 2008

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BF4 ladders.



I think teams should be okay for 10v10 team. Enough teams folding to spread the numbers rof.

Quote from EP on the 14th of January 2014

As tradition holds, exile5 shall place top 3 as the game dies. Congratulations.

Quote from dluX on the 14th of January 2014

6 years ago

x5LIVE presents: Avant Gaming vs. Team Immunity (iM Masters GRAND FINAL!)

sounds like an amazing game all round
6 years ago

Battlefield 4



lol i dont usually give fkwits time of day in here but seems like this guy finally has all the forum attention he's been beggin

Quote from Lelouch on the 16th of June 2013

are you kidding, after reading through all the forums to get a idea of what went on,spot your cg's running joke and you don't even know it.

but unfortunately im not the quantumx or 1manarmy ect.

Quote from SpotTheOzzie on the 16th of June 2013

Posts don't include... enough random dots to be quantum..........
7 years ago

IP/Network Camera Review


I'm one of those overly security conscious people, some may say to a fault. I can't count the number of times I've turned around halfway down the street to come back home because I have a slight niggle in the back of my head that I haven't locked the front door or the gate – even though I always do. Being able to monitor your premises whilst you aren't there is extremely desirable for a lot of home and business owners alike, and now with a variety of wired and wireless options available on the market it is extremely affordable and simple to setup. The model that I will be looking at today supports Ethernet and WiFi, as well as the option to connect it to a compatible home alarm systems.

Main Features:
    Simple to setup, friendly GUI, DIY installation High image and video quality Two-way audio monitoring Allow remote pan/tilt control Auto IR-LED illumination for night vision Allow remote viewing and record from anywhere anytime Supports any browsers Wi-Fi compliant with IEEE 802.11 b/g/n Motion detection alert via email or upload image to FTP Multi-level users management with password protection Free DDNS service and free multilingual recording software

What you get in the box:
    IP/Network Camera Detachable WiFi antenna RJ45 (Ethernet cable) Camera mounting arm and screws Alarm input wire mount Utility CD – contains software and manual 5v power adapter



Camera design:
The camera design is pretty simple, the body is comprised mainly of plastic and has a smooth, shiny black finish. Around the front of the lense there are a series of LEDS, these allow the camera to pick up footage in pitch black environments. There is also a small green LED which lets you know that the device is operational, and whether it is connected to a network via Ethernet or WiFi. At the rear of the camera there is an I/O panel for audio, Ethernet, a connection for the WiFI antenna, alarm system and finally the power input. On the base of the camera there is a factory reset button which can be used in the event that you need to wipe any existing configuration options on the camera.


Setup:
The camera doesn't come with any physical documentation for the setup process, so you will have to run the CD that came with the packaging. Luckily the CD has both written documentation as well as video instructions on how to setup and configure the camera. The first step is to plug the camera into your network and then run the "BSearch_en.exe" program.

Once you have BSearch up and running you will need to search for the camera and then configure it. For those who aren't too network savvy I've included the basic instructions below, which combined with the video documentation, should have it up and running in no time.
    1.Search for IP/Network devices on the network 2. Select the device 3. Configure the IP information. I've set mine camera up with a static IP so that it will retain the same IP address even if the unit is powered down. The subnet mask is the subdivision of the network, most home networking equipment will have this as 255.255.255.0, however you can run ipconfig on your computer and match up the settings. The gateway is the IP address of your modem/router on the network and the DNS server should be set to the ones provided by your ISP, these should be accessible by a quick Google search, or you can just set the DNS1 setting to your gateway which will just have the modem/router pass it on. The HTTP port is what port you will be using to access the device's configuration through your browser. 4. Configure a username and password for watching the cameras stream. 5. Update the settings – it should now all be configured.


Now that the camera is configured you can browse to the graphical user interface and login. When you first login you will be asked which browser you are using and then directed to the view screen. This allows you to monitor the cameras feed as well as move it around and configure the video settings. At the top there are several different pages that you can browse to and make additional changes.



Once connected via Ethernet and configured you can browse to the Network page and connect it to your WiFi signal so that you can move the camera around and not have to rely on an Ethernet cable to ensure connectivity.


An excellent feature that is also in the Network page is the ability to configure a DDNS service, this means that you can access the cameras feed and configuration page whilst you are at work or on holiday.


Under the Alarm settings you have a variety of options that allow you to be notified whenever there is any motion detected by the camera or your home alarm is armed, alerting you by email which also sends a series of still images taken, uploading the images to an FTP server or enabling your home alarm system. There is also a scheduling option that allows you to adjust the times that the camera would notify you, if you are guaranteed to be home at a set time on certain days you can simply ignore these periods of time.


If you don't have a home alarm system the send email on alarm option is the best immediate notification that you can configure on the camera, in my testing I found that the emails were delivered with the images in less than a half a minute and it was extremely easy to configure using my own email address and settings.


Among the other options (I go through these in depth in my video review) another useful feature is the ability to configure multiple users and their access level. This would be extremely handy for configuring a viewing only account for people who you did not want to give full configuration write access to.


Whilst the browser viewer may be enough for most, the CD also comes with some software called IP Camera Centralization Monitor, which allows users to view up to 64 cameras at a time. It is configured with the same settings used as the original setup and also allows video to be recorded onto a hard drive.


There are also a variety of paid and free apps available for Android and iOS which can be used to view the cameras feed and control it on the go.

Performance:
I've tested the camera out for about three weeks now, mounting it in different locations in the house, and stalking cats in the dark. In both well lit and pitch black environments I've been please with the image quality. Keep in mind that this is a standard definition camera, the highest resolution it can take images, and record video at is 640*480, so it isn't going to match up to the high definition images and video that can be recorded with most smart phones currently available on the market – that isn't something that this product has set out to do.

Using the IP Camera Centralization Monitor software that came in the box, you can also choose to record footage directly from the camera onto a hard drive. Footage that I recorded with the highest resolution available will play back at roughly 20FPS (as reported by FRAPS) so its a bit choppier than normal video. If you wanted to benefit from a smoother video you can always drop the resolution down to 320*240 which plays back at about 30FPS, however the quality will obviously decrease. To be honest, not having seamless video playback isn't a huge issue for me with a camera at this price point. If I were to run this side by side with a much more expensive HD IP camera and have them both recording 24/7, this cameras video size would be tiny in comparison (the footage below is only 800KB) which is ideal for users who want the camera to constantly record, but don't have a huge amount of hard drive space.

Viewing the camera (without recording) yields a smooth 30FPS on 640×480 resolution.



Conclusion:
I've been testing this camera out for about 3 weeks now on my network and I can say that I'm thoroughly impressed with it. The setup and configuration is extremely easy and for those who aren't too technical with networking it comes with plenty of written and video documentation on the CD. It is jam packed full of features like the ability to connect over WiFi as well as Ethernet (perfect if your ideal spot only has a power point and you don't want to run Ethernet cables there), monitor the feed remotely over third party applications on your Android/iOS device or computer software and built in night vision.

Whilst the image quality isn't HD it is great for a standard definition camera in this price range. Overall, if you are in the market for an IP/Network camera that will allow you to monitor the goings on at your home or business, for a great price I would definitely recommend taking a look at this product. In fact some security companies such as Smart Home also include the camera in their security packages.




$88 inc. shipping

8 years ago

Noontec Zoro Headphones Review


Over the last three months I've been working overseas, commuting for just under three hours a day to and from the office. This has been the perfect opportunity for me to test out Noontec's entry into the headphone market – listening to music, podcasts and watching movies to distract myself from the surroundings, which I liked to call the "organised chaos" of the Manila roads.


Main Features:
    Adjustable headband Fold-up design Steel reinforcement on hinges Piano crafting varnish finish Protein cotton and adaptive ear muffs Plug-in audio cable with a unique flat design



What you get in the box:
    Zoro headphones 1.2m 3.5mm gold plated audio cable Storage pouch

The included 1.2m detachable audio cable is more than an adequate length for those who plan to listen to music on a device that is in a pocket, or the pouch of a backpack – however if you plan on using the Zoro at your computer you may need to invest in a longer 3.5mm male-to-male cable if you sit a reasonable distance from the tower. The cable has a flat design which means it won't wrinkle or knot, you can easily just wrap the cable around the headphones after use and won't have to worry about untangling a huge mess next time you use it.

Noontec have also included a small, velvet-like carrying pouch which fits the headphones snugly in when they are folded up to make sure the finish doesn't get scratched up at the bottom of your bag.


Design:
The Zoro is mainly constructed out of plastic which has a nice glossy finish, the version that I have for review is black however you can also pick them up in white or red variations as well. Overall they feel extremely sturdy, I've been folding and unfolding them at least twice a day over the last three months and the steel reinforced hinges are showing no sing of wear and tear or loosening. For logos we have a Noontec one located at the top of the headband, Zoro written just above each hinge on the side of the frame and another Noontec logo on each earmuff.

The 3.5mm female jack is found on the bottom of the left hand earpad.




Comfort:
At the inner peak of the headband there is a small leather-ish material which covers a thin pad of foam. The earmuffs are comprised of a soft cotton-like material with foam on the inside. The Zoro's design is to have the ear muffs sit over your ears rather than around them. I found that the ample cushioning of the earmuffs and the ability to adjust the headband size allows you to wear the headphones for hours on end without experiencing any discomfort or pressure.



Performance:
I tested the Zoro's on a variety of different music genres, podcasts as well as movies and found that across the board the audio quality has been fantastic for an entry class set of headphones. The sounds are clear, crisp and surprisingly also able to pack a decent bass punch too.

With the Zoro's being an open ear styled heaphone, it isn't expected that they are going to be the best for blocking outside world noises. In my testing I found that they were fairly adequate in this regard, if you are commuting you won't have any issues drowning out the noises of other people on the train or bus, however if you are in a high noise environment you may need to turn the volume up a few notches. The other downfall of an open ear style headphone is that they do have the tendency to leak noise if you listen to music fairly loudly like myself, this could possibly disturb others around you if you are in a close space environment.


Conclusion:
I don’t think that anyone will argue that the design of the Zoro is extremely familiar to the Dr Dre Beat Solo’s, infact after browsing around the web for a while there are some people that are suggesting that the Zoro’s sound better, despite being roughly half the price of the Solo’s. Without actually testing the Solo’s personally I can’t confirm their claims, but what I can tell you is that I found the Zoro’s to be an extremely comfortable, lightweight set of headphones that have excellent sound quality for their price range. If you are thinking about upgrading your current portable audio setup that I would definitely recommend trying them out for yourself.

8 years ago

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Slantski

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9 years ago

Alehandro

10 years ago

Slanty

10 years ago

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